Definition of One. Dictionary.


One (wŭn), a. [OE. one, on, an, AS. ān; akin to D. een, OS. ēn, OFries. ēn, ān, G. ein, Dan. een, Sw. en, Icel. einn, Goth. ains, W. un, Ir. & Gael. aon, L. unus, earlier oinos, oenos, Gr. o'inh the ace on dice; cf. Skr. ēka. The same word as the indefinite article a, an. √ 299. Cf. 2d A, 1st An, Alone, Anon, Any, None, Nonce, Only, Onion, Unit.] 1. Being a single unit, or entire being or thing, and no more; not multifold; single; individual.
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The dream of Pharaoh is one.
Gen. xli. 25.
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O that we now had here
But one ten thousand of those men in England.
Shak.
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2. Denoting a person or thing conceived or spoken of indefinitely; a certain. “I am the sister of one Claudio” [Shak.], that is, of a certain man named Claudio.
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3. Pointing out a contrast, or denoting a particular thing or person different from some other specified; -- used as a correlative adjective, with or without the.
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From the one side of heaven unto the other.
Deut. iv. 32.
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4. Closely bound together; undivided; united; constituting a whole.
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The church is therefore one, though the members may be many.
Bp. Pearson
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5. Single in kind; the same; a common.
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One plague was on you all, and on your lords.
1 Sam. vi. 4.
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6. Single; unmarried. [Obs.]
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Men may counsel a woman to be one.
Chaucer.
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&hand_; One is often used in forming compound words, the meaning of which is obvious; as, one-armed, one-celled, one-eyed, one-handed, one-hearted, one-horned, one-idead, one-leaved, one-masted, one-ribbed, one-story, one-syllable, one-stringed, one-winged, etc.
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All one, of the same or equal nature, or consequence; all the same; as, he says that it is all one what course you take. Shak. -- One day. (a) On a certain day, not definitely specified, referring to time past.
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One day when Phoebe fair,
With all her band, was following the chase.
Spenser.
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(b) Referring to future time: At some uncertain day or period in the future; some day.
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Well, I will marry one day.
Shak.
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One, n. 1. A single unit; as, one is the base of all numbers.
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2. A symbol representing a unit, as 1, or i.
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3. A single person or thing. “The shining ones.” Bunyan. “Hence, with your little ones.” Shak.
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He will hate the one, and love the other.
Matt. vi. 24.
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That we may sit, one on thy right hand, and the other on thy left hand, in thy glory.
Mark x. 37.
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After one, after one fashion; alike. [Obs.] Chaucer. -- At one, in agreement or concord. See At one, in the Vocab. -- Ever in one, continually; perpetually; always. [Obs.] Chaucer. -- In one, in union; in a single whole. -- One and one, One by one, singly; one at a time; one after another. “Raising one by one the suppliant crew.” Dryden. -- one on one contesting an opponent individually; -- in a contest. -- go one on one, to contest one opponent by oneself; -- in a game, esp. basketball.
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One (wŭn), indef. pron. Any person, indefinitely; a person or body; as, what one would have well done, one should do one's self.
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It was well worth one's while.
Hawthorne.
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Against this sort of condemnation one must steel one's self as one best can.
G. Eliot.
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One is often used with some, any, no, each, every, such, a, many a, another, the other, etc. It is sometimes joined with another, to denote a reciprocal relation.
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When any one heareth the word.
Matt. xiii. 19.
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She knew every one who was any one in the land of Bohemia.
Compton Reade.
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The Peloponnesians and the Athenians fought against one another.
Jowett (Thucyd. ).
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The gentry received one another.
Thackeray.
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One, v. t. To cause to become one; to gather into a single whole; to unite; to assimilite. [Obs.]
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The rich folk that embraced and oned all their heart to treasure of the world.
Chaucer.
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